The future of family owned businesses in India

The dominance of family owned businesses in India is well known. However, has what Malvinder Singh done with Ranbaxy shown us what’s to come in years ahead?

For those not watching, Malvinder Singh was the Chairman & CEO of Ranbaxy, India’s largest pharmaceuticals company, who decided that he’s had enough and stepped down.

Ranbaxy was bought by Malvinder’s grandfather, who saw the opportunity in the generics market of India for low cost drugs. Malvinder’s father took charge and grew the business to spectacular levels and took it to a global platform. Malvinder was initiated into the business when his father was diagnosed with cancer. He took on various minor roles in a short span and then emerged as the CEO.

During his apprenticeship, the role of leading Ranbaxy was instituted in a professional CEO – one who wasn’t a member of the family – and at that time, the general public saw this as a positive move and various commentators suggested that the future had arrived. Little did they realise that Malvinder would take charge and sweep aside the same professional management that they had put in place. In fact, Malvinder went that step further and argued that just because his family owned a majority stake didn’t mean he wasn’t “professional” or “qualified” to lead the firm.

Yes, he also brought success to the firm and vindicated his convinction of leading the firm to new heights – most notably, with the sale of his family stake to a Japanese firm for approx $5bn. He may have retained his position as CEO of the firm, but I suspect that after various issues related to the US drugs regulator and also their huge losses, he would’ve had no choice but to walk.

In one way, this seems to complete the story. With the sale of their stake, Malvinder hung in there and still talked of Ranbaxy as an Indian firm. With his exit, Ranbaxy can move on.

So, has Malvinder shown us the future of family owned businesses? Please post your comments.